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that it would be difficult to ratify an u.n. treaty that is based on existing u.s. law. but then again you might not have met the modern republican party where ideological zealots rule. on july 26 1990, president george bush sr. signed the americans with disabilities act. the bill passed the house and the senate with only 34 legislate34legislators total opposing it. yet today 38 republican senators voted no on the u.n. treaty that would extend the ada to the rest of the world. inclusion six who had voted yay on the bill in 19 ott. this was sufficient to block it. the treaty was adopted by the united nations six years ago and has since been ratified by 126 countries, just not the united states. even a last-minute appeal by former senator bob dole himself a disabled veteran, as well as every major veterans group and even the chamber of commerce could not sway senate republicans. but this is what has become of the republican party. a party whose views often dissend to the lowest common denominator and defined by paranoid fears of the u.n. that are devoid of any fact whatsoever. so one could underst
if you have a handicap, i have seen friends of mine do it. they can get everywhere because of the laws. and i know clint eastwood doesn't like these laws but tough. then you get to -- they want to extend it to europe, other countries we can travel, so people in this country can travel to those countries knowing they're not going to be handicapped any more than they are by facilities. why would a republican vote against such a deal? you first and then john. >> there's a lot of pressure from the right on this. there's the paranoia from the u.n. >> explain it. >> the notion that the u.n. is going to come in and tell us what to do. the fact of the matter is this treaty raises the world to the standard of the u.s. doesn't require the u.s. to change its standards at all and doesn't in any way give the u.n. power to do anything in this country. but i think it's -- all you have to do is say u.n. and people on the right get very exorcised. rick santorum helped lead the opposition to this treaty. i think he's out of step with the american people, out of step, by the way, on this tax cuts for the
. ♪ ♪ gerri: tonight, did president oba break the law? some in the senate say yes, and now the cases in front of a judge. we will have a heated dbate. with more than a million charities and the u.s. alone, how did you find the best one? we have you covered. "welcome to "the willis report." hello, everybody. i'm gerri willis. tonight no progress on the fiscal cliff as democrats and republicans trade barbs over the issue. one group of americans is finding a way through this regardless of congress and the presiden small-business owners in this country are preparing to hire. join me now, chief u.s. economist for i may just pull one side. heart of america group founder, and member of the jobs creation alliance and actual job creators in this country who say their voices not being heard in this office took with debate. also with us from the weekly standard, steven haze. welcome. great to have you here. i want to start with the conversation in washington and what the speaker had to say about the status of the fiscal here is mr. boehner. >> this is in the progress report because there is no progress
in the the health care law might mauck you down right sick right now. the white house just announcing plans to slap health insurers with a fee if they sell insurance dictated by the president's health care law and larry says you'll pay for it no matter where you live, huh? >> that's right. that's right, you know, administrative costs and health care are already skyrocketing and this is going it to get past the consumer just like everybody else. we already see skyrocketing health care costs, 14% is administrated, it's just too much. >> some parts of the law lower prices and is it net neutral, basically? >> i think the only given is that the country as a whole is goingo spend mor on health care andore people are going to have insurance one way or another, gun point are fine or whatever it is, but the actual premiums among are necessarily going to change. although there are plenty of things to raise your premium, not allowing the insurance company to reject, is going to raise premiums and some premiums are paid for like a tax next year, on capital gains for wealthy people, it's not health care payment
is unconstitutional and today she told law enforcement to use their own discretion. >> this will make clear to them that they have the right to release those undocumented immigrants if they believe that 's in the best interest of public safety in their community. >> secure communities instructs law enforcement to hold undocuments immigrants until ice can pick them up. critics say it clogs jails and nets too many people who are not dangerous criminals. >>> federal regulators have given the green light to disney's $4 billion deal to purchase bay area-based lucas film. there's still no word on formal closing dates and neither company has responded to requests for comment. lucas film founder george lucas is to receive about half of the purchase price in cash and half in newly-issued disney shares. he said he plans to donate much of it to charity. >>> wall street is reacting positively to news of a net fliks deal with disney. netflix stock jumped some 14% on word that the los gatos-based company has secured the rights to stream new disney movies shortly after they're out of theaters. that won't happen,
to court and bankruptcy law versus pension law. you can see current services cut. tax hikes and other lousy outcomes if we don't see reforms. >> you admit we are having problems paying out the pensions. they are bankrupting. >> the pblem is that los angeles is not the place. and it is a ballot initiative. you have front runners that become mayor . they will not support it it was a nonstarter and never going to work in thetave . you have a better chance of succeeding. >> at least it was a plan . it is no law that said you cannot change 401 k's. that is future and new hires and for their plans. you don't have ill defed benefits and by the way the private sector doesn't get. there is a pension liabity in the state of the california. vicki is right. government services are starting to get cut in cities in california . so i tell you, it doesn't cut it when you have things like let's raise the retirement age to age 52. >> the fact is, these things are going broke. right now the budget 26 percent of la's budget is consumed by the budget cuts and what are you going to do? >> i agree. there is i a p
. this hits at the core capability of international maritime law, freedom of transit, freedom of navigation rights. lou: we have not heard from the state department or the white house on that challenge. i do want to turn to one statement by -- you mentioned defense secretary leon panetta. he sai the united states should have what he called an enduring presence in afghanistan to pursue the counter-terrorism effort, the long war that has become the fhion of the last to the ministrations. your thoughts as we wrap up. >> let me tell you about this enlightened. of warfare, counter insurgency. what is, in fact, we are trading our american military life's with the restrictive rules of engagements in the hope of winning the hearts and minds of the tribal society. this is crazy. your first responsibility is to the protection and safety of your own men and women. lou: admiral, terrific of you to be here, and we appreciate. and i know that many of our forces, is not nely all appreciate what you just said about lon morris. admiral james lyons, thank you. up next, one republican congressman gets a littl
this opportunity of hopefully, we join together to see that marriage equality becomes the law of this land. [cheering and applauding] >> we have that opportunity to do so. and i think everybody who holds office or holds an appointed position in the city is proud to see this diversity. this is what we have worked so hard, so many struggles. and we still remind ourselves of the night of the assassination and what had occurred and how this city was so divided. i believe now that there is such a great unity. when we talk about diversity in the city, how that unity transforms itself. it really is part of our dna in everything that we do. and, so, it is in this spirit that i welcome all of you to this 34th tribute and this remembrance. it is in the spirit that we set a foundation continually to go forward and be even more diverse and continue to invite people who have never been a part of this government, take up it this responsibility with us. help us bring more people into the economy, to the wonderful city of san francisco. * make sure that their lives are respected with dignity and with the
their feet can no longer treat the reform law like a boogeyman that will disappear if they wish hard enough. because, if i may borrow a phrase from method man, when the american people elected president obama, they let you know it's real. yes, it's really real son. even the president's political nemesis, john boehner, knows that to be true. >> you had said next year that you would repeal the health care vote. that still your mission? >> i think the election changes that. it's pretty clear that the president was re-elected, obama care is the law of the land. >> now, of course, boehner promptly walked those comments back later that day. that doesn't make what he said any less of a fact. central to the implementation of that law is the creation of health care exchanges. now, let me explain. these aca exchanges are online marketplaces. in short, websites. the idea is to force insurance companies to play by the same rules and compete for a large pool of customers resulting in less expensive premiums for everyone. here's how it works. let's say you're one of the 50 million people in in country wi
to work will pass the final vote on tuesday. we have hardworking people in michigan. >> the law makes union membership and dues optional in the heart of the rust belt. cradle of the organized labor. they insist they are not breaking the labor union because it does not target collective bargaining. this weakens their foundation. >> you have people alongside of you that won't pay the union dues if you pay the union dues but will still be able to get the benefit from being union member. >> spokesman for democratic caucus says to anticipate legal challenge is understatement. democrats will target the language in the laws. given the bill through the lame duck session and noisy demonstrators out of the chambers the democrats say they will challenge under the open meetings laws. >> they lied to us every step of the way and they are acting like cowards. >> he says it's leadership. >> baloney. >> as demonstrators storm the capitol, police used pepper spray. additional state troopers sent to lansing today with anticipation that the demonstrations will peak on tuesday. >> we want to keep things
in undergraduate hours, law school, or high school. i have learned more about history, government, the true history of this country. not what we have been spoonfed in high school. or in critical about the pleasant stories where we were happy with smiles on their face. where we have come from and how far we have come and how far we can go in terms of really being that bright and shining lfght for other countries to follow by example. host: is that it? caller: please, please, is there some way we can make texas c- span? they will not go on tv for people who are on satellite. we are bleeding republicans in this state with these voting machines. texas used to be such a good state to be from. host: what do you mean, make texas c-span? caller: i would like to see a c- span texas. i bet there are a lot of people and a lot of states that would like to see that. host: your earlier comments, can we use those for a commercial? thank you for calling in this morning. here is more facebook comments on our question this morning. keenan says -- john says -- sal says -- and ruben says -- don from book raton, hi, do
into the fast food places after your law went into effect and people said, oh, yeah, it's great we can see the calorie count and we are paying more attention and then the look at the receipts and saw they were eating more calories. didn't do any good. >> well, let me just say this. the best thing that we can do is to give the consumer the choice. the option. >> you wrote a book titled, everything i want to do is illegal. >> right. [applause] >> what's your point? >> my point is that everytime the government penetrates into the food system, the abuses mount occupy from the big guys and little guys like us get rooted back from the table due to a smothering bunch of regulations. >> the little guys, it puts them oust business, the big guys can afford these rules. >> absolutely. the regulations are nonscalable. all sound wonderful when you first say them, and then as soon as the get implement on the ground, the innovative prototypes who want to bring innovation the marketplace have such a large overhead to get a place at the market place that these embryonic prototypes of innovation are stillbo
in the courthouse when d.n.a. started coming into be used at the courthouse. prior to that many law enforcement and prosecutors had to rely on blood samples and fingerprints, but once d.n.a. came in and we learned everybody has a unique genetic makeup and it can be connected and traced to perpetrators of crime when they commit a crime, especially in sexual assault cases. and convictions have gone up. the evidence is better. the proof beyond a reasonable doubt is much more available in d.n.a. cases. in 1985, there was a 13-year-old girl named lavenia masters. she lived in dallas, texas. she told her folks good night. she went to her bedroom which should be, mr. speaker, the safest place on earth for children -- went to sleep and during the middle of the night she was woken up by an outlaw putting a knife to her throat and he sexually assaulted her. then he snuck away in the darkness of the night. that was in 1985. she went to the hospital. her parents took care of her medical needs. d.n.a. evidence was taken from her. it was given to the law enforcement authorities, but that d.n.a. evidence from
that law, that bill and prevent it from becoming law because they want to have a lottery. for crying out loud. the absurdities compound themselves. >> in general we have to recognize that the individual entrepreneur with special skills and contributions to american produce all the jobs, and they are the ones who are getting rich, who are punished by any increase in marginal t rates. the already rich -- lou: whatabout the young man or woman in this country who is not an entrepreneur, is not a bg shot, is not in middle management in a big corporation. they won a break. they won an opportunity. they want to live the american dream. why can't the republicans talk to them? >> i hink that they are being talked to. a great speech th other day in which he specifically addressed this aspiration, widespread among all americans to rise up. this is what supply-side economics is. is surge of economics. it is not trickle-down as some people caricatured. lou: you have heard that expression for 30 years. >> i never said it. lou: i'm amazed to hear the phrase escape ... but you mention one senator, and
was decidedly unamused. >> obviously, the vice, what the australian broadcaster did may well have broken the law. on the other hand, they've apologized for it. so we're going to have a long and careful think about what, if anything, we do. >> reporter: the station said it was the easier prank call it had ever made. >> when is a good time to come and visit her? because i'm the queen, so i need to get down there. >> i would suggest anytime after 9:00 would be suitable. >> reporter: easy for a nurse, what she's supposed to do when someone calls up saying it's the queen, ask for proof. what started as a story here about a difficult beginning to a pregnancy became more than that. it became one of a patient confidentiality and about humor, and about bad accents. >> thank you, mark phillips. >>> in egypt this morning army tanks are protecting the presidential papplace as the president prepares to speak to the nation tonight. at least five people killed overnight and hundreds wounded as opponents fought out the palace gates. more demonstrations are planned today in cairo. holly williams is there. holly,
were in law school together, we were fellow janitors at hastings college of law. george moscone was amazing. he was just as aggressive about inclusionary activities. he was just as focused on sharing. and he had an immense pride in the city and county of san francisco like no other. i suspect that much of my love of the city comes from my exposure to george in those very early years. george went through a considerable amount of evolutionary process politically. he allowed john burton to talk him into running for the state legislature. an unsuccessful effort for the state assembly. he went on to become, obviously, a supervisor in the city and county of san francisco. and in those days it was a different city. it was dramatically different. there was no such thing as a so-called progressive, david campos. there was no such thing as somebody in that category. george moscone, philip burton, represented that which we all now richly enjoy. george went on to become a state senator. and in that capacity, scott, it was george moscone who shepherded the bill that removed criminal penaltie
to take these young women when they are interacting with law enforcement because a lot of them find themselves into prostitution and get treated like perpetrators as opposed to victims. this is the psychology of a perpetrator but they are victims and we have to get law enforcement and our judicial system to treat these women as victims and put them in a setting to pull themselves away from drug addition. >> in a minute, politico is -- politico is going to ask you some questions. one of the questions that has come in, who is the best leader in washington, d.c.? >> robert griffin, iii. >> why did the majority of americans reject the republican party in the recent election? >> it was an election and it was a very close election. if you look at the nims and the differences between the two. i think the republican party can do a better job of limited government and freep enterprise movement and connect those policies. >> why has there been a failure to connect? >> i'm not sure there is one reason for it and i haven't had time to think about it why it has happened but it needs to happen. t
-run health insurance exchange to implement, as you know, a key part of the president's federal law. how is that likely to go over with the nearly i think it's 20% of residents in her state that have no health insurance? >> well, it shouldn't go over well, and we'll see whether that 20% rises up and says, look, this is the law. you have to follow the law. also i wonder if there's anything, anything that the federal government can do to get miss brewer -- governor brewer to do right by the citizens of her state. >> governor brewer hosted the western governors association winter meeting this weekend, yet when she delivered her keynote speech on the subject of energy, only two of her fellow governors showed up. maybe they'd heard her answer a report aers question about climate change. >> everybody has an opinion on it, you know, and, you know, i probably don't believe that it's manmade. i believe that, you know, that weather and certain elements are controlled maybe by different things. >> controlled by different things. do you think she spent too much time in the sunshine? >> different thi
's tied up in sequestration, and the way the -- as i understand it anyway -- the way the law requires the cuts to be taken, it really is, it really is an axe right at the middle which will be very difficult to do in any kind of smooth way. so i'm confident that, you know, with a little longer-term view the pentagon can be fine. and one of the things that the group agrees on is that both with that time and where we are in terms of our overall requirements in a changing world, the advancement of technology, the quality of the people we have -- and they're the best i've seen in over 43 years of having the privilege to wear the uniform -- that we will be fine from a defense standpoint. but i also would pick up on what senator nunn said, quoting bill perry. and i've seen this in countries and in regions globally where the failure to be able to invest in preventive defense, engagement, having a relationship, helping other militaries train in their own countries, the not being able to do that just increases the likelihood of some kind of conflict breaking out which may or may not involve us.
conservatives quit the deportation law and order harshness. then i think having put that aside, having shown there's some compassion i think you can go back to that group, george w. bush got 40%, jeb bush got close to 50%, governor perry gets a high amount. it can to be done, star. >> i'm not saying it can't to be done but you can't say that even under george bush the policy was very different within the republican party when it looked at immigration in shutting the borders. has it intensified? yes. i'm from california. i understand what you're talking about. this is v-very difficult rhetoric that's been put against this particular people. but that's not the only question when we're talking about the latino community. >> star parker, thank you. i want to talk to you some more. we'll go back to the fiscal cliff. if high end tax rates are successful entrepreneurs rocket higher, you can bet the number of millionaires in this country is going south. that's if high taxes go up. millionaires go down. that's no good. in our land of opportunity, i want more millionaires. and i think the better for t
.62%. what are you waiting for? this is big news. >>> on thursday, washington's state's new laws legalizing marijuana and gay marriage went into effect. >> from snl to mtv, this is no laughing matter for joe manchin. he is tanking on mtv over a new reality show. he wants the network to cancel the show, set to air early next year. the 12 episodes show cast members drinking beer, drinking, fighting, and using the bed of a truck as a swimming pool. >>> the white house now has an official appearance on pinterest. they want to make the people's house open and accessible to the public, this is one way they're doing it. the white house already has it's own twitter and facebook accounts as well. >> most of us know by now the fiscal cliff is looming. if lawmakers don't come up with a deal, our taxes will go up and dramatic spending cuts will affect agencies across the board, and that includes the food and drug administration. emily schmidt explains what it could all mean for your food. >> susan, the federal government says americans spend about a trillion dollars a year on food. there are two agenci
me finish the point fimay. the law signed will give students flexibility to pay back under the condition they pay back the loans and that is important reform as well tracey is right. the principle issue is whether kids coming out of the college have an opportunity to get a job. that's what we need to fix. >> john than, i wanto g to wae rogers. john thob's education in the bahamas aside. education is important for all of the kids, but the debt is bad for all of us. that is a bigger problem here. >> there has to be a happy medium. i agree with julian. you have to educate the public and we have to have a better way to run it. the federal government can run it any better than anybody else. there is so many ways for a kid to go to collegeo apply for all kinds of scholarships and either thingings andine if student lones and i rked in college. i had a loan and i worked to help pay off that loan while in college. there are ways to correct the system to make it work. john you know kids don't hav the same advantages . they need the help and from government to get through at a shotf a
:30 a.m. >> washbourne went to harvard law school. he emigrated out west to illinois where the lead mine industry was in its heyday. he arrived after a month's journey by ship, by stagecoach, by train, and arrived in this muddy mining town, boarded himself in a log cabin, established a look -- law practice. he worked his way up and became a successful lawyer. he got involved politically, ran for congress. served for eight terms. he befriended abraham lincoln and you sillies s. gragrant. washbourne was a close confidante. after grant was elected president, he appointed washbou rne secretary of state. washbourne became ill. his family felt for his life -- there for his life. he submitted his resignation. grant accepted his resignation. over the next couple of months, he regained his health, which was always fragile. grant offered him the position as minister of france and ambassador. >> michael hill, elihu washbourne. the only diplomat from a major power to stay during the siege of paris. son and 9:00. >> first lady mr. obama welcome to military families to the white house for this season'
better decisions, better policies. this term algorithmic regulation, which means you can have laws and policies in the cities determined by data and not just what we think is best, but what's actually best. so, as cities keep catching on and more and more with the data, you're going to see some really interesting things coming out. >> cool. while we're talking about data, another part of the announcement today was also motion loft making private data available within sort of that initiative and that website wrieri'd like to hear a little more, john, about kind of deciding to share that data with the city and also a lot of times especially with other companies you see them being very protective of their data. there is a lot of value there. how do you sort of balance, protecting the value of your data and commercial viability versus making it available to the public? >> so, we have a unique problem, i think, to a lot of start-ups in the fact that we have a product that we sell and a lot of different vertical. we also have data we want to provide to the society at large. and how do we
said. the supreme court is the law of the land. >> when i hear these accusations that black people voter i.d. loss disproportionately affect minorities -- implies to me that somehow we have something missing in our brain. as -- if white americans can get id to vote and go through all the processes to follow the laws, what are you telling black people? that somehow they are not good enough? that is what bothers me about a lot of the rhetoric coming from democrats and the left. we always have to make -- there has to be a special mass when we deal with minorities because they are too feeble minded. we really need to make concessions for them because they cannot follow the rules like everybody else. when you treat people like victims, i do not think they want to ask bair. wright, ith crystal righ sunday night at 8:00 on c-span's "q&a." >> they both -- politicians from both sides said they would be able to avoid the fiscal cliff. this included chris van hollen. also, senators mark warner and bob corker, a republican from tennessee. this is one hour. >> good morning. i'm the head of bloo
, dividends. current laws, they go back up. dividends treated as ordinary income. capital gains goes back up to 20%. how much revenue are we talking about? if those become bargaining chips, how much are we giving up? >> under current law, the capital gains rate is scheduled to go to 20%. we are actually talking 23.8%. dividends are scheduled to go to ordinary rates. you need the 3.8% for people who have higher incomes. significant increases in both are scheduled. as you think about the fiscal cliff and what is coming, one of the few places you can see people responding to it is in their behavior around capital gains and dividends. companies are moving up to how, shareholders take a vintage of a lower rate. i expect you will see more investors realize lower capital gains in order to get lower rates. there is clearly money there. there is clearly money that has interesting, distributional characteristics. as you think about the political process trying to structure when a package with a revenue goal and a distribution goal, my prediction is you will see at least some of those increases occur.
. it is coming in. it's been legislated law. so the question for him if he so against it, if he thinks it's a moral outrage, will he commit to reverse their? yes or no? [shouting] >> position number one. on welfare benefits, the chancellor grilled about welfare benefits. by the simple question again. with a support us against a welfare operating bill? what are they going to do on that? are they going to vote for the bill or against the bill? it's a very simple question. we've got now for the first time spending plans for 2015, 16. he said nothing about whether he supports those lands even though he hopes to be chancellor during that year. does he support the spending plans? he didn't say anything about that. he talked about the three g and they're shouting that need. the 4g license, were using before g license. let me say something. can i say something about the 4g license? >> you've had 20 minutes and you didn't make any points at all. [laughter] >> we are using before g money including building colleges, one of which is for this city college in a town called morley and west yorkshire. [
the subway extension project. wildlife protection laws required bart to stop construction on a new line underneath lake liz beth whenever a nesting bird was found so crews installed inflatable dancers like the ones used outside car lots to prevent birds from nesting paying for biologists to monitor the bird battle also contribute today that unexpected cost. >>> several mothers and their families marched onto capitol hill today with a message about the fiscal cliff. members of the group delivered teddy bears to lawmakers saying that, quote, can't bear more than their fair share. they say congress needs to add tresz the so-called fiscal cliff before scheduled tax sxhieks spending cuts go into effect. one berkeley mother was among those in washington. >> like many families, i don't have any other place to cut right now so we're here to stand up and make sure that our voices are heard. >> the group also delivered signed petitions urging congress to end the bush tax cuts for the wealthy. >>> representatives from huns of charities have descended on capitol hill in an effort to dlsh there has
-raisers. >>> federal judge temporarily blocks federal law, banning the use of conversion therapy. his ruling applies to only three providers who want the law overturned. the therapy is aimed at helping change a minor sexual orientation from gay to straight. >>> 13 people dead, 32 wounded. now the judge in the case has been removed. u.s. court of appeals for the armed services says the judge showed bias when he ordered h hasan be forcibly shaved before his court-martial. hasasm n argued that he grew a beard in accordance with his muslim faith and the order violated his religious freedom. with the san antonio express news, joining us this morning. welcome. >> thank you. >> i thought it was against army regulations to have facial hair. >> it generally is. the regulation is so strict, in fact, that most of the people i've known in the military don't even wear mustaches. and when they did, they were in the war zone. for example, invasion of iraq, one of my buddies wore a pretty thick mustache. that was out of regulation but no one cares when you're in the war zone. at fd hood, that's a different matter.
counterpart tom daschle. the two did something called compromise. a concept that facilitates law foreign in today's congress. watch. >> i had a red phone where when i picked up that phone, it rang only one place. on tom daschle's desk. and when he picked it up, i knew i was talking to tom daschle. not his staff. not my staff. sometimes he and i lead when our conferences were not ready to move. i remember i called one time i called him, i stepped out from a conference meeting and tom you know we need to do this, i'm having problem and he said i am too, let's go, i will see you on the floor. we went up on the floor of the senate, we called the bill up and passed it by sundown. you got to do that every now and then even though you might catch a little flash from those in your conference. it is called leadership, anderson. >> just to clarify, a red phone was on republican leader trent lott's desk and a red phone was on leader tom daschle desk. when the red phone rang on daschle's desk, he knew it was lott. and when lot's phone rang, he knew it was daschle. both. and why can't both chame beve
to try to see if there is a way we can break through the law jim and go ahead and get things done. i am here to tell you that nobody wants to get this done more than me. i know that you have had a lot of briefings. let me describe where the situation is right now with respect to our fiscal situation, both for the opportunities are and where the challenges are. i campaigned over the last year on the idea that we need to make sure that this economy is growing, that we are providing ladders of opportunity. connell: president obama there in washington. we have lost the shop. if we get it back, we can rejoin the president. one of the things he talked about, passionately rooting for the success of the business leaders. dagen: i think that is fair. about an hour after speaker boehner spoke this morning about the fiscal cliff ago she haitians. in case you missed it, a quick piece of that. >> if you look at the plant that the white house has talked about thus far, they could not pass either house. dagen: rich benson is here. he is joining us with the latest from d.c. >> i think you can tell wher
code book on disabilities. not going tos it's change the laws, and he is lying. host: you're talking about yesterday's debate in the senate. caller: exactly. i wish he would be as passionate about try to get people on the west coast back to work. if they would work as hard on that as the disabilities act, this country would not have the fiscal cliff because people would be working. everybody is always trying to blame the tea party. but tea party did not put this country in debt. but the party is trying to bring it to the attention of the people that these entitlements cannot be afforded any more. it is like your charge card. if you keep charging and taking and taking, pretty soon you have to pay it back. that is what is going on with this fiscal cliff. it's time to pay. it's not the republican party's fault. obama has been in office four years. he has doubled to the trillions of dollars in debt. host: are you a tea party supporter? caller: i'm not affiliated with the tea party, but i am tired of hearing them blame it, because i see the hard-working generation that are in their 60s th
benefits you get after the health care law. open enrollment ends december 7th. so now's the time. visit medicare.gov or call 1-800-medicare. so now's the time. music is a universal language. but when i was in an accident... i was worried the health care system spoke a language all its own with unitedhealthcare, i got help that fit my life. information on my phone. connection to doctors who get where i'm from. and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never missed a beat. we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. >>> we should not be sitting around twiddling our thumbs. the clock is running. we face a fiscal cliff. there are some in this chamber who have said, oh, we need to go off of it. we'll go off of it. we'll pay the price and then we'll finally sit down and do what's right. i would, with all due respect, say that's pretty stupid. >> that was some blunt talk from my next guest, republican senator from georgia, johnny isaacson. that was two and a half weeks ago. the more things change, the more th
on american law. this treaty isn't about american behavior except to the degree that it influences other countries to be more like us. this treaty is about the behavior of other countries and their willingness to raise their treatment of people with disabilities to our level. it's that simple. this treaty isn't about changing america. it's a treaty to change the world to be more like america. so why join? i've heard my colleagues ask several times. why, if it doesn't have recourse in the law, why join? i'll tell you why, mr. preside mr. president. because we can sit at the table and affect the lives of our citizens by pushing other countries upwards. because we gain credibility and accelerate change through our advocacy by being part of a process. because it's good for american business, which can sell products and services as other nations raise their standards and need our expertise to meet their goals, which is why, incidentally, the united states chamber of commerce supports this treaty and a huge number of businesses. why support it? because george h.w. bush started this process and
that the electoral law allows for them residing outside of the country to vote. working in collaboration with organizations such as the office of the high commissioner for the refugees that speaks with displaced persons and refugees the government could take steps to allow the significant population of refugees in the neighboring countries and the internally displaced persons to hold the region's. at the same time, as logistically challenging as it may be, holding elections in the major cities and in the northern regions would be this strong guest impossible of mali's sovereignty or territory and steps of rebuilding a democracy. the transition government is government plans and actions to the public and the crisis of legitimacy. the international community needs to harmonize its approach toward the pursuit of the polls that could lead to the legitimately elected government and military actions to detect the north. the contradictory public that take the military option off the table in the short and medium-term may only serve to emboldened the extra hauling them time to reinforce their pr
to out law lesbian and gay teachers in our schools, tom, a gay teacher himself, spoke out and was the facebook, the picture book of that campaign. so, we aloe tom an incredible debt, and we thank you so much. * all owe (applause) [cheering and applauding] >> thank you so much. there is a note from willie brown that says, tom, be short. [laughter] >> i don't know, scott. every time i see you, i want to take off my clothes. i don't know what that is. [laughter] >> you can read into that whatever you wanted to. i think you should see from the remarks that preceded me that one strong attribute of both these extraordinary men was a sense of humor and a sense of irony. i've often thought about the differences in their background and how they came together in that context that juxtaposition in history. you know, san francisco, as the former mayor and speaker mentioned, was very eclectic, electric at the time, women's movement, the lgbt movement, the civil rights movement, and, you know, things were happening, boys and girls. harvey's election i think made people take notice. i
in central europe, leading the region in laws and in the constitution of equality 16 years ago to a complete reversal today. it's got one of the worst records today of the deprivation of rights of women, roma people, jews, and lgbt people. sound familiar, that grouping? i was not prepared for what i was going to find in budapest. i was not prepared for the thousands ofneo nazis and state sanctioned militia that would meet a couple hundred marchers, thousands of them. * there was one young man, 21 years old, young hungarian, who would be the only person to go on tv with me, only hungarian, malan would take a blow horn and walk through the streets against families that hated us, and he walked and he shouted and he kept the morale up as we were walking against this sea of people who didn't like us because we were representing the inclusion and diversity that we so much cherish here. he was inspired by the story of my uncle and he said to me, do you think this is how harvey felt? and i said to him, it's exactly how harvey felt. now, after the march i learned that malan had refused to go into the
person out of 370 million americans who can sign something into law and that's the president. >> 60% of americans are asking the wealthy to pay more. >> reporter: a "the washington post" poll say 53% of americans will blame republicans and 29% would hold the president responsible if the nation goes over the fiscal cliff. the two sides appear close to an agreement on little things. it could lead to higher airline ticket prices and no more mail delivery on saturday. >> oh, boy. susan mcginnis in washington this morning. susan, thank you so much. one of the tax breaks due to expire next month is the payroll tax. that's the tax listed on your pay stub as fica. the money you pay into social security and medicare. it was reduced by two percentage points during the recession. jim axelrod has more. >> reporter: the payroll tax cut has given this family an extra $70 a month to spend. john is a maintenance man in jersey city, new jersey. >> are you paying any attention to what's going on in washington right now? >> of course. >> reporter: their $50,000 a year income put them almost exactly in
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